About the Webinar

Healthcare organizations are being asked to assume more and more financial risk for their patients’ health, with limited insights into the nonclinical factors contributing to that risk. Now more than ever, clinicians must understand the non-clinical factors that influence, and often determine, a patient’s health outcomes. As organizations expand their approach to population health management, one thing is certain, they cannot underestimate the importance of identifying social risk and building partnerships with community agencies and social services to address this risk. Whether this means identifying high-risk patients with a stratification model based on non-clinical factors or enabling a meaningful conversation about social vulnerabilities between the doctor and patient, providers can leverage AI and Machine Learning technology, along with non-traditional activated data sets to impact the health of their populations and win at Value-Based Care.

You will learn

  • Where can healthcare organizations turn to understand best practices of how to leverage community-based and public health resources to enhance clinical care outcomes?
  • What are examples of successful collaborations between healthcare organizations and social service agencies and groups?
  • How can providers gain insights into the non-clinical factors that impact their patients’ health?
  • What are the barriers for healthcare organizations to incorporate non-clinical data into their analytics and risk models?
  • What is the evolving role of modern technologies like AI and Machine Learning as we begin to address these previously ignored aspects of healthcare?

Register for the webinar

About the Webinar

Healthcare organizations are being asked to assume more and more financial risk for their patients’ health, with limited insights into the nonclinical factors contributing to that risk. Now more than ever, clinicians must understand the non-clinical factors that influence, and often determine, a patient’s health outcomes. As organizations expand their approach to population health management, one thing is certain, they cannot underestimate the importance of identifying social risk and building partnerships with community agencies and social services to address this risk. Whether this means identifying high-risk patients with a stratification model based on non-clinical factors or enabling a meaningful conversation about social vulnerabilities between the doctor and patient, providers can leverage AI and Machine Learning technology, along with non-traditional activated data sets to impact the health of their populations and win at Value-Based Care.

You will learn

  • Where can healthcare organizations turn to understand best practices of how to leverage community-based and public health resources to enhance clinical care outcomes?
  • What are examples of successful collaborations between healthcare organizations and social service agencies and groups?
  • How can providers gain insights into the non-clinical factors that impact their patients’ health?
  • What are the barriers for healthcare organizations to incorporate non-clinical data into their analytics and risk models?
  • What is the evolving role of modern technologies like AI and Machine Learning as we begin to address these previously ignored aspects of healthcare?

About the Presenters

Adrienne White-Faines MPA, FACHE
Adrienne White-Faines MPA, FACHE
Healthcare Strategy Executive & former CEO, American Osteopathic Association

Adrienne White-Faines, MPA, FACHE is a nationally respected healthcare executive and strategist, and a Fellow of Leadership Greater Chicago as well as the American College of Healthcare Executives. She most recently served as the CEO of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), representing more than 150,000 Osteopathic physicians and medical students nationwide. Prior to the AOA, Adrienne served as VP and Chief Health Officer at the American Cancer Society, Illinois Division, with accountability for research, education, advocacy, and patient service programs. She also served as COO of a national health care consulting and physician practice management firm, and served in strategy development for 15 years at urban academic and public hospital systems in Chicago and New York City. Ms White-Faines currently serves on the Boards of Otho S.A. Sprague Memorial Institute, and Erikson Institute in Chicago, Illinois, and is a past Board member of the PCPCC.

Nathan Riggle
Nathan Riggle
Division Director of Analytics, MercyOne Population Health Service Organization (PHSO)

Nathan Riggle is the Division Director of Analytics at MercyOne Population Health Service Organization (PHSO). In this role, Nathan manages analytics, data, and IT work that supports the care management and population health initiatives at the organization. He is also leading and supporting multiple PHSO strategic initiatives, which strive to help the organization grow and succeed in the ever-changing healthcare industry. Additionally, he serves as a member of MercyOne IT Steering Committee, helping to drive all organizational IT projects and implementations. Prior to joining MercyOne PHSO, Nathan worked for 8 years in analytic consulting with the management consulting firm ZS Associates, and as an internal consultant at Principal Financial. Nathan Riggle received his bachelors in mathematics and economics from Creighton University and did his Master’s in Business Administration from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Emily K. Fletcher, MPH
Emily K. Fletcher, MPH
Ambulatory Care Program Manager, MercyOne Population Health Service Organization (PHSO)

Emily Fletcher is the Ambulatory Care Program Manager at MercyOne Population Health Service Organization (PHSO). She leads the integration of Health Coaches, Social Workers, Pharmacists, and Community Health Workers into the medical home to positively impact consumer experience and patient outcomes. Emily received her Bachelor’s degree in Socio-Political Communications from Missouri State University and a Master’s degree in Public Health from the University of North Texas Health Science Center. She completed her practicum with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in Dallas, Texas. Emily started at MercyOne in 2010, working in oncology research for five years before joining the PHSO in 2016. She served a two-year term as Vice Chair of the Institutional Review Board. Emily’s goal is to create a health care environment where all patients have the same opportunity to be healthy. Addressing health-related social needs through the community health worker program is a key strategy in accomplishing this goal.